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Poetry, war, brutality... the war in Ukraine has galvanized many in Ukraine to pick up arms. Artists have picked up the brush and musicians recorded songs to express the everyday horror and pain of this war. Poets have turned to words.

War in Ukraine: Gender & Poetry Part 2
Monday, May 9 from 4:00 PM–5:00 PM

Join us for a conversation with poets who are using their words to create change in Ukraine. This conversation among writers and scholars will inspire dialogue about how literature heals, fights, and plays a key role in this war, and all wars. Women, too, have been hit particularly hard—whether as mothers, poets, workers, wives—and some of the many themes that we will discuss include the intersections of war and gender, and war and poetry.

Featuring poets Anna Gruver and Yuliya Charnyshova with Dr. Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach moderating this discussion.

Register to attend at go.fiu.edu/UkraineWomen

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Yuliya Charnyshova is a Belarusian poet and a researcher of Anglohphone and Slavonic poetry of the 20th–21st centuries. She was born in Minsk in 1998 and is now living in Lviv, Ukraine. Her work in Russian and English has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Words Without Borders (as a co-translator), and F-Pismo, among other forums. She's also the editor of Danyil Zadorozhnyi's bilingual (written in Ukrainian and Russian) poetry book Nebezpechni Formy Blyz'kosti ("Dangerous Forms of Intimacy," Dnipro: Gerda press, 2021).

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Anna Gruver, a Ukrainian poet and essayist, was born in 1996 in Donetsk. She is the author of the 2019 book of poems Nothing Was Found at Your Request (translated title). Her poems have been translated into English, Polish, Hebrew, Romanian, Lithuanian, and Russian, and have been published in particular in the journals Sho, F-letter, in the media sites Litcentr, Soloneba, and in other fora. Gruver translates essays and contemporary poetry from Ukrainian into Polish and vice versa. Anna has translated a book by Katie Ferris Boysgirls from English into Ukrainian (2021). In 2019, Anna received third prize in the prestigious "Smoloskyp" literary competition for young writers. She was co-editor of the bilingual poetry journal Paradigma (2019–2021). Gruver also published interviews with famous Ukrainian writers, including Lyuba Yakmchuk, Iryna Shuvalova, Ostap Slyvynsky, Oksana Lutsyshyna. She is studying Hebrew Studies at the Jagiellonian University. Before the 2022 war, Anna lived in Kharkiv and Kyiv. She remains at present in Ukraine.

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Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach emigrated from Dnipro, Ukraine, as a Jewish refugee in 1993, when she was six years old. She is the author of three poetry collections: The Many Names for Mother, winner of the Wick Poetry Prize (Kent State University Press, 2019), finalist for the Jewish Book Award; Don't Touch the Bones (Lost Horse Press, 2020), winner of the 2019 Idaho Poetry Prize; and 40 WEEKS, forthcoming from YesYes Books in 2023. Her poems appear in POETRY, Blackbird, American Poetry Review, and The Nation, among others. She holds an MFA from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory from the University of Pennsylvannia. Her dissertation, "Lyric Witness: Intergenerational (Re)collection of the Holocaust in Contemporary American Poetry," pays particular attention to the underrepresented atrocity in the former Soviet territories. She is the founder and host of Words Together, Worlds Apart (@wtwa2020), a virtual poetry reading series born out of the pandemic but meant to outlast it. She is currently the Murphy Visiting Fellow in Poetry at Hendrix Colelge and lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with her two kids, cat, dog, and husband.

Past Event
  • Part 1

    Poetry, war, brutality... the war in Ukraine has galvanized many in Ukraine to pick up arms. Artists have picked up the brush and musicians recorded songs to express the everyday horror and pain of this war. Poets have turned to words.

    Join us this upcoming Monday at 4:00PM for a conversation with poets who are using their words to create change in Ukraine. This conversation among writers and scholars will inspire dialogue about how literature heals, fights, and plays a key role in this war, and all wars. Women, too, have been hit particularly hard—whether as mothers, poets, workers, wives—and some of the many themes that we will discuss include the intersections of war and gender, and war and poetry.

    Featuring poets Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach, Lyudmyla Khersonska, and Olga Livshin with Ana Menendez moderating this discussion.

    Register to attend at go.fiu.edu/UkraineWomen

Support the UNICEF Emergency Ukraine Fund

This event is also a fundraiser, so if you have the means, please make a suggested donation of $5. Scan the QR code to donate through Venmo with Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach (one of our featured poets) or send your donation through Julia’s PayPal to jkolch@gmail.com